Courses

October 27th, 2009

The list of courses below is current as of August 30, 2013.

Please note that information is subject to change before the start of each quarter so be sure to check the Stanford Bulletin at the beginning of each quarter for updates.

2013-14 Linguistics Courses (2014-15 courses posted mid-July)

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

The cognitive organization of linguistic structure and the social nature of language use. Why language learning is difficult. Why computers have trouble understanding human languages. How languages differ from one another. How and why speakers of the same language speak differently. How language is used strategically.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 44N: Living with Two Languages

Preference to freshmen. The nature of bi- and multilingualism with emphasis on the social and educational effects in the U.S. and worldwide, in individual versus society, and in child and adult. The social, cognitive, psycholinguistic, and neurological consequences of bilingualism. Participation in planning and carrying out a research project in language use and bilingualism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 47N: Languages, Dialects, Speakers

Preference to freshmen. Variation and change in languages from around the world; the roots, historical development, and linguistic and social structures of variation; how languages differ from one another and how issues in linguistics connect to other social and cultural issues; the systematic study of language.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 52N: Spoken Sexuality: Language and the Social Construction of Sexuality (FEMGEN 52N)

This course, divided into three sections, examines the many ways language is used in the construction of sexuality and sexual identity. In the first section, we consider how language is used as a resource for performing and perceiving sexual identity. Drawing on detailed linguistic analyses of pronunciation, word choice, and grammar, we will address questions such as the following: Is there a gay accent? Why isn’t there a lesbian accent? How do transgendered people modify their linguistic behavior when transitioning? How are unmarked (heterosexual) identities linguistically constructed? While sexuality is largely an issue of identity, it is also an issue of desire. In the second section of the course, we examine iconic relations between elements of language (e.g. breathy voice quality, high pitch) and aspects of desire (e.g. arousal, excitement). In the final section, we investigate ways in which language encodes ideologies about sexuality. Specifically, we will study how language is used to talk about sexuality in public discourses about gay marriage and bullying, as well as in personal narratives of coming out. We will also consider how language encodes dominant ideologies about sexuality, evident in labels for sexual minorities as well as terminology for sex acts. Class activities will center on discussions of readings, explorations of how sexuality is portrayed in popular media, and analyses of primary data. Students will be expected to write a final research paper on a topic of their choice.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 63N: The Language of Comics

This seminar will explore language as represented in cartoons and comics such as Bizarro, Dilbert and Zits, how we interpret it, and why we find comics funny. We will explore and analyze language play, genderspeak and teenspeak; peeving about usage; new and spreading usages.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Traugott, E. (PI) ; Zwicky, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 265)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin’ and rappin’), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, GER:ECAmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 83Q: Translation

Preference to sophomores. What is a translation? The increased need for translations in the modern world due to factors such as tourism and terrorism, localization and globalization, diplomacy and treaties, law and religion, and literature and science. How to meet this need; different kinds of translation for different purposes; what makes one translation better than another; why some texts are more difficult to translate than others. Can some of this work be done by machines? Are there things that cannot be said in some languages?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, Writing2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 90: Teaching Spoken English

Practical approach to teaching English to non-native speakers. Teaching principles and the features of English which present difficulties. Preparation of lessons, practice teaching in class, and tutoring of non-native speaker.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Staff

LINGUIST 105: Phonetics (LINGUIST 205A)

The study of speech sounds: how to produce them, how to perceive them, and their acoustic properties. The influence of production and perception systems on sound change and phonological patterns. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques. Lab exercises. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 110: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology

Differences in the sounds of the world’s languages and how these sounds are made by the human vocal tract. Theories that account for cross-linguistic similarities in the face of differences.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 120: Introduction to Syntax

Grammatical constructions, primarily English, and their consequences for a general theory of language. Practical experience in forming and testing linguistic hypotheses, reading, and constructing rules.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lassiter, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 121: Crosslinguistic Syntax

A data-driven introduction to the methods of syntactic analysis, and their results. Emphasis is on understanding how languages are systematically alike and different in their basic sentence structure. Focuses on building up syntactic argumentation skills via the collective development of a partial formal theory of sentence structure, which attempts to model native speaker knowledge. Draws on data from a diverse array of the world’s languages, including but not limited to English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 130A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 230A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include ambiguity, vagueness, presupposition, intonational meaning, and Grice’s theory of conversational implicature. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as PHIL 150 or 151, should also enroll in 130C. Pre- or corequisite: 120, 121, consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Potts, C. (PI)

LINGUIST 130B: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. The course focuses on the core semantic properties and internal organization of the four major word classes in natural languages: nouns, adjectives, prepositions, verbs. This course draws on material from English and other languages to illustrate the range of word meanings found across languages and to investigate possible word meanings. Prerequisites: Linguist 1 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Linguist 130A is not a prerequisite for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 140: Language Acquisition I (LINGUIST 240)

Processes of language acquisition in early childhood; stages in development; theoretical issues and research questions. Practical experience in data collection.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 141: Language and Gesture

History of work on gesture, gestural systems associated with particular languages/cultures, and with specific activities – music, sports, traffic management, stock exchanges, etc. Examine gesture developmentally and how gesture is represented in painting and animation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 144: Introduction to Cognitive and Information Sciences (PHIL 190, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 100)

The history, foundations, and accomplishments of the cognitive sciences, including presentations by leading Stanford researchers in artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, and psychology. Overview of the issues addressed in the Symbolic Systems major.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 150: Language in Society

How language and society affect each other. Class, age, ethnic, and gender differences in speech. Prestige and stigma associated with different ways of speaking and the politics of language. The strategic use of language. Stylistic practice; how speakers use language to construct styles and adapt their language to different audiences and social contexts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eckert, P. (PI)

LINGUIST 152: Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies (LINGUIST 252)

Introduction to pidgins and creoles, organized around the main stages in the pidgin-creole life cycle: pidginization, creolization, and decreolization. Focus is on transformations in the English language as it was transported from Britain to Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. Resultant pidginized and creolized varieties such as Nigerian Pidgin English, Chinese Pidgin English, New Guinea Tok Pisin, Suriname Sranan, and the creole continua of Guyana, Jamaica, and Hawaii. Also French, Dutch, Portugese, Chinook, Motu, and Sango.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 156: Language and Gender

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, GER:ECGender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eckert, P. (PI)

LINGUIST 157: Sociophonetics (LINGUIST 257)

The study of phonetic aspects of sociolinguistic variation and the social significance of phonetic variation. Acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody, and voice quality. Hands-on work on collaborative research project. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 162: History Through Language

What we can learn about the human past through human language, especially where proper historical records are absent. Studying population migrations through language spread. Different types of change in different social environments: grammatical “simplification” of imperial languages vs. complexity of tribal languages. Effects of contact on languages. Methods for reconstructing linguistic past: comparative method, linguistic paleontology, computational phylogenetic methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 163: History of the English Language (ENGLISH 171H)

This course traces the history of the English language from its roots through its earliest written records into the present. It will trace the fundamental changes that English has undergone in terms of morphology, phonology, syntax, semantics, and vocabulary. It will also explore some of the social, cultural, and historical forces that affect language. The course emphasizes the pre-modern history of English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBHum, WAY-AII | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Karnes, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 167: Languages of the World

The diversity of human languages, their sound systems, vocabularies, and grammars. Tracing historical relationships between languages and language families. Parallels with genetic evolutionary theory. Language policy, endangered languages and heritage languages. Classification of sign languages.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 171: Iberian Languages: Structure, Variation & Context

The course will center on Iberian languages with a special focus on Catalan. We will consider the relation between language structure and other factors, such as language variation in space and time, and sociological and political factors. Topics will include a contrastive analysis of selected features of Iberian languages, a survey of dialectal variation in some of the languages of the area and of their external linguistic history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Bonet, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 180: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 280)

Automated processing of less structured information: human language text and speech, web pages, social networks, genome sequences, with goal of automatically extracting meaning and structure. Methods include: string algorithms, automata and transducers, hidden Markov models, graph algorithms, XML processing. Applications such as information retrieval, text classification, social network models, machine translation, genomic sequence alignment, word meaning extraction, and speech recognition. Prerequisite: CS103, CS107, CS109.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 183: Programming and Algorithms for Natural Language Processing (LINGUIST 283)

Construction of computer programs for linguistic processes such as string search, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis and generation, and simple machine translation. Emphasis is on the algorithms that have proved most useful for solving such problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DBEngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 188: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 288)

Machine understanding of human language. Computational semantics (determination of word sense and synonymy, event structure and thematic roles, time, aspect, causation, compositional semantics, scopal operators), and computational pragmatics and discourse (coherence, coreference resolution, information packaging, dialogue structure). Theoretical issues, online resources, and relevance to applications including question answering and summarization. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180 / CS 124 / CS 224N,S: and logic such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 191: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 291)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DBSocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 196: Introduction to Research for Undergraduates

Introduction to Research for Undergraduates. Research seminar for undergraduate students interested in linguistics. Presentations by Stanford linguistics faculty and graduate students who will discuss their own research projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 197A: Undergraduate Research Seminar

Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 198: Honors Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 199: Independent Study

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 204: Philosophy of Linguistics (PHIL 369, SYMSYS 204)

Philosophical issues raised by contemporary work in linguistics. Topics include: the subject matter of linguistics (especially internalism vs. externalism), methodology and data (especially the role of quantitative methods and the reliance on intuitions), the relationship between language and thought (varieties of Whorfianism and anti-Whorfianism), nativist arguments about language acquisition, and language evolution.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wasow, T. (PI)

LINGUIST 205A: Phonetics (LINGUIST 105)

The study of speech sounds: how to produce them, how to perceive them, and their acoustic properties. The influence of production and perception systems on sound change and phonological patterns. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques. Lab exercises. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 207: Seminar in Phonetics: The Perception and Recognition of Clear and Casual Speech

Through readings and discussion, we will focus on two questions in this seminar: (1) Is the balance of top-down versus bottom-up information different when processing careful vs. casual speech? (2) What provides more information to a listener – Half of a clearly-articulated word, or an entire reduced word? This is not a project-based seminar, but the seminar is linked to an ongoing research project, and we will use that project to ground how a researcher might go about addressing the above questions. We will refer to our in-progress project to provide concrete examples of (a) testable, theoretically-grounded hypotheses, (b) appropriately matched methods/design, (c) benefits/costs of different types of statistical methods, and (d) supported vs. speculative accounts. The seminar is heavily based on reading and discussion, but will be supplemented by the practical issues associated with a related project. At the end of the seminar, students will have a basic understanding of the literature related to the topic, what gaps/inconsistencies exist in that work, and how to pursue those gaps, if interested. A research proposal is required at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 210A: Phonology

Phonology. Introduction to phonological theory and analysis based on cross-linguistic evidence. Topics: phonological representations including features, syllables, metrical structure; phonological processes including assimilation and dissimilation; and phonological typology and universals; Optimality Theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 210B: Advanced Phonology

A comparison of Stratal OT, Transderivational OT, and rule-based approaches, primarily on the empirical basis of stress, syllable structure, and prosodic organization. Course may be repeated once.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 211: Metrics

Principles of versification from a linguistic point of view. Traditional and optimality-theoretic approaches. The canonical system of English metrics, and its varieties and offshoots. The typology of metrical systems and its linguistic basis. The ideology of normative prosodic discourse in relation to changing poetic practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 218: Seminar on Morphological Theories

Word formation and the lexicon: empirical generalizations and theoretical approaches. Lexicalist and Distributed Morphology. How words are built and interpreted: constituency and headedness, morpheme order and scope, the mirror principle, bracketing paradoxes, the hierarchy of functional categories. Paradigms, blocking, gaps, periphrasis, syncretism. Locality, head movement vs. selection, constraints on allomorphy, incorporation, polysynthesis, cliticization and prosodic re-ordering phenomena.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 222A: Foundations of Syntactic Theory I

The roles of the verb and the lexicon in the determination of sentence syntax and their treatment in modern grammatical theories. Empirical underpinnings of core phenomena, including the argument/adjunct distinction, argument structure and argument realization, control and raising, operations on argument structure and grammatical function changing rules. Motivations for a lexicalist approach rooted in principles of lexical expression and subcategorization satisfaction. Prerequisite: 120 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 222B: Foundations of Syntactic Theory II

The nature of unbounded dependency constructions and their treatment in modern grammatical theories. Filler-gap dependencies, island constraints, and the relation between grammar and processing. Prerequisite: 222A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Wasow, T. (PI)

LINGUIST 230A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 130A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include ambiguity, vagueness, presupposition, intonational meaning, and Grice’s theory of conversational implicature. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as PHIL 150 or 151, should also enroll in 130C. Pre- or corequisite: 120, 121, consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Potts, C. (PI)

LINGUIST 230B: Semantics and Pragmatics I

Expands on 130A/230A. Detailed study of selected topics in formal semantics and pragmatics. Prerequisites: LINGUIST 130A/230A or permission from instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lassiter, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 230C: Semantics and Pragmatics II

Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Prerequisites: LINGUIST 230B or permission from instructor

LINGUIST 232A: Lexical Semantics

Introduction to issues in word meaning, focused primarily around verbs. Overview of the core semantic properties of verbs and the organization of the verb lexicon. Approaches to lexical semantic representation, including semantic role lists, proto-roles, and causal and aspectual theories of event conceptualization.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Levin, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 237: Seminar in Semantics: Gradation & Modality

Discussion of major semantic theories of modality and gradation, with special attention to empirical and logical issues that arise from the study of gradable modals.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lassiter, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 239: Semantics and Pragmatics Research Seminar

Presentation of ongoing research in semantics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

LINGUIST 240: Language Acquisition I (LINGUIST 140)

Processes of language acquisition in early childhood; stages in development; theoretical issues and research questions. Practical experience in data collection.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 241: Language Acquisition II

Pragmatics and acquisition. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 251: Sociolinguistic Field Methods

Strengths and weaknesses of the principal methods of data collection in sociolinguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 252: Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies (LINGUIST 152)

Introduction to pidgins and creoles, organized around the main stages in the pidgin-creole life cycle: pidginization, creolization, and decreolization. Focus is on transformations in the English language as it was transported from Britain to Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. Resultant pidginized and creolized varieties such as Nigerian Pidgin English, Chinese Pidgin English, New Guinea Tok Pisin, Suriname Sranan, and the creole continua of Guyana, Jamaica, and Hawaii. Also French, Dutch, Portugese, Chinook, Motu, and Sango.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 255A: Seminar in Sociolinguistics: California Dialectology

Topics vary by quarter. Current topic is based on sociolinguistic interviews gathered in the first two field seasons of the Voices of California project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Eckert, P. (PI)

LINGUIST 255B: Sociolinguistics Classics and Community Studies

This course discusses some of the major community studies in sociolinguistics (e.g. Labov in NYC, Wolfram in Detroit, Trudgill in Norwich, Milroy in Belfast, and a selection of others up to the present) and the work of other classic sociolinguistic figures (e.g. Romaine, Hymes) who contributed in other ways. Our goal is to reach a deep understanding and critique of their methods, findings and ideas, to improve our own research and our responses to new developments in the field.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 256: Language, Gender and Sexuality

The role of language in constructing gender and sexuality. Historical overview of major theoretical perspectives and debates (difference vs. dominance, identity vs. desire) and discussion of new directions (affect, embodiment, figures of personhood, experimental approaches). Previous coursework in sociolinguistics recommended. Prerequisites: LING 250 and 110 or the equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 257: Sociophonetics (LINGUIST 157)

The study of phonetic aspects of sociolinguistic variation and the social significance of phonetic variation. Acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody, and voice quality. Hands-on work on collaborative research project. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 258: Analysis of Variation

The quantitative study of linguistic variability in time, space, and society emphasizing social constraints in variation. Hands-on work with variable data. Prerequisites: 105/205 and 250, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 265: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin’ and rappin’), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 272: Structure of Finnish

Central topics in Finnish morphology, syntax, and semantics and how they bear on current theoretical debates. Topics: clause structure; case; aspect; word order.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI) ; Karttunen, L. (PI) ; Kiparsky, P. (PI)

LINGUIST 278: Programming for Linguists

Computer programming techniques for collecting and analyzing data in linguistic research. Introduction to the UNIX, regular expressions, and Python scripting. Hands-on experience gathering, formatting, and manipulating corpus, field, and experimental data, combining data from multiple sources, and working with existing tools. Knowledge of computer programming not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Potts, C. (PI)

LINGUIST 280: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 180)

Automated processing of less structured information: human language text and speech, web pages, social networks, genome sequences, with goal of automatically extracting meaning and structure. Methods include: string algorithms, automata and transducers, hidden Markov models, graph algorithms, XML processing. Applications such as information retrieval, text classification, social network models, machine translation, genomic sequence alignment, word meaning extraction, and speech recognition. Prerequisite: CS103, CS107, CS109.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 283: Programming and Algorithms for Natural Language Processing (LINGUIST 183)

Construction of computer programs for linguistic processes such as string search, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis and generation, and simple machine translation. Emphasis is on the algorithms that have proved most useful for solving such problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 284: Natural Language Processing (CS 224N)

Methods for processing human language information and the underlying computational properties of natural languages. Syntactic and semantic processing from linguistic and algorithmic perspectives. Focus is on modern quantitative techniques in NLP: using large corpora, statistical models for acquisition, translation, and interpretation; and representative systems. Prerequisites: CS124 or CS121/221.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Manning, C. (PI)

LINGUIST 285: Spoken Language Processing (CS 224S)

Introduction to spoken language technology with an emphasis on dialogue and conversational systems. Automatic speech recognition, extraction of affect and social meaning from speech, speech synthesis, dialogue management, and applications to digital assistants, search, and recommender systems. Prerequisites: CS 124, 221, 224N, or 229.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 286: Information Retrieval and Web Search (CS 276)

Text information retrieval systems; efficient text indexing; Boolean, vector space, and probabilistic retrieval models; ranking and rank aggregation; evaluating IR systems. Text clustering and classification: classification algorithms, latent semantic indexing, taxonomy induction; Web search engines including crawling and indexing, link-based algorithms, and web metadata. Prerequisites: CS 107, CS 109, CS 161.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 288: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 188)

Machine understanding of human language. Computational semantics (determination of word sense and synonymy, event structure and thematic roles, time, aspect, causation, compositional semantics, scopal operators), and computational pragmatics and discourse (coherence, coreference resolution, information packaging, dialogue structure). Theoretical issues, online resources, and relevance to applications including question answering and summarization. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180 / CS 124 / CS 224N,S: and logic such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 291: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 191)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 294: Linguistic Research Discussion Group

Restricted to first-year Linguistics Ph.D. students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wasow, T. (PI)

LINGUIST 390: M.A. Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 394: TA Training Workshop

For second-year graduate students in Linguistics
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Levin, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 395: Research Workshop

Restricted to students in the doctoral program. Student presentations of research toward qualifying papers. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Levin, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 396: Research Projects in Linguistics

Mentored research project for first-year graduate students in linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

LINGUIST 397: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 398: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 399: Dissertation Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 |Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

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